First make fresh chicken broth. Clean and cut the vegetables for the stock. Add the herbs, bring to the boil and add the soup chicken. Leave for 2 hours simmer and foam regularly to obtain a clear broth. Strain and cook the stock for another quarter of an hour to make the flavor more intense. Allow to cool and put the stock in the refrigerator overnight. Degrease afterwards for further use. Take a large soup kettle, put in the pieces of skinned chicken, rabbit and veal spoulet. Pour in vinegar and water over it, in a ratio of 1 to 2.5 volumes. Cut the onions into coarse pieces and add them together with bay leaves and thyme. Season with pepper and salt. Pour in a quarter of a bottle of dry white wine, bring to a boil and foam. Leave to simmer for about 45 minutes. Then check the cooking of the meat and decide to extend the cooking time. Remove the defatted chicken broth from the fridge and warm without boiling. Let gelatine sheets soak in cold water. The amount thereof depends on your preference for the desired binding of the end result. Keep in mind that the acid in the dish reduces the binding power of the gelatin. Some recipes go up to 15 leaves per liter of liquid. Dissolve the soaked gelatine in the lukewarm chicken broth. Take a pottery bowl (type Römertopf) and place a few lemon slices on the bottom. Scoop the cooked meat with the onions from the soup kettle, drain and put it in the bowl.

Potted meat from Poperinge  

broiler chicken, cut up rabbit, cut up calf poulet vinegar dry white wine  
fresh chicken broth: soup chicken onions leeks carrots celery fresh thyme laurel salt
Foto: tested, a variant with only chicken and portioned in individual jars
biocitron onions gelatin leaves laurel thyme white pepper salt
Pour over the lukewarm chicken stock. Stir and season with a little pepper, salt and lemon juice if desired. Put the bowl in the refrigerator, at least until the next day. Serve with a fresh salad and fries. And of course with a local beer!
The West Flemish hennepot is related to the potjevlesch from French Flanders. The difference would be that for the hennepot, the pieces of chicken and rabbit are not deboned.
A Recipe Guide For The Amateur Chef Belgian Cuisine
The West Flemish hennepot is related to the potjevlesch from French Flanders. The difference would be that for the hennepot, the pieces of chicken and rabbit are not deboned.

Potted meat

from Poperinge  

broiler chicken, cut up rabbit, cut up calf poulet vinegar dry white wine  
fresh chicken broth: soup chicken onions leeks carrots celery fresh thyme laurel salt
biocitron onions gelatin leaves laurel thyme white pepper salt
First make fresh chicken broth. Clean and cut the vegetables for the stock. Add the herbs, bring to the boil and add the soup chicken. Leave for 2 hours simmer and foam regularly to obtain a clear broth. Strain and cook the stock for another quarter of an hour to make the flavor more intense. Allow to cool and put the stock in the refrigerator overnight. Degrease afterwards for further use. Take a large soup kettle, put in the pieces of skinned chicken, rabbit and veal spoulet. Pour in vinegar and water over it, in a ratio of 1 to 2.5 volumes. Cut the onions into coarse pieces and add them together with bay leaves and thyme. Season with pepper and salt. Pour in a quarter of a bottle of dry white wine, bring to a boil and foam. Leave to simmer for about 45 minutes. Then check the cooking of the meat and decide to extend the cooking time. Remove the defatted chicken broth from the fridge and warm without boiling. Let gelatine sheets soak in cold water. The amount thereof depends on your preference for the desired binding of the end result. Keep in mind that the acid in the dish reduces the binding power of the gelatin. Some recipes go up to 15 leaves per liter of liquid. Dissolve the soaked gelatine in the lukewarm chicken broth. Take a pottery bowl (type Römertopf) and place a few lemon slices on the bottom. Scoop the cooked meat with the onions from the soup kettle, drain and put it in the bowl.
Pour over the lukewarm chicken stock. Stir and season with a little pepper, salt and lemon juice if desired. Put the bowl in the refrigerator, at least until the next day. Serve with a fresh salad and fries. And of course with a local beer!
Foto: tested, a variant with only chicken and portioned in individual jars
a recipe guide for the amateur chef Belgian Cuisine